Tag: garden design huntingdon

As a recently graduated young designer I was thrilled to have a client who was not only Business Woman of the Year, but also gave me a carte blanche to design and construct her garden.

The oriental atmosphere and peripheral pathway with garden pavilions that linked the primary and secondary spaces of the ‘L’ shaped garden were inspired by the interior design of the home. This worked well and integrated the garden and ground floor living space, with the garden maturing as the vegetation grew.

Ermine Street is the old Roman road that ran from London, through the Roman Fortification of Godmanchester on the south bank of the River Great Ouse, and where, on the north bank, the Anglo-Saxon town of Huntingdon was founded.

This garden site was a ground floor flat in Huntingdon’s old Workhouse, a Grade II listed building, behind which ran the the railway line linking London to Edinburgh.

With such varied history, the front garden design was eclectic, using salvaged and re-used materials including timber sleepers (not taken from the railway despiite local rumour!), roman style quarry tiles and eighteenth century reclaimed yorkstone slabs.

 

Most of my private commissions result in hand drawn plans and reports. I usually work on trace paper with ink, copy the original onto paper and hand colour the paper print with pantone and pro-marker inks.

For computer rendered drawings I prefer the initial drawing layer to still be hand-drawn black and white base.

The coloured original is then scanned and annotated, often submitted as part of a data collection and concept to design development report submission.

The scale, complexity and content of the drawings closely reflects the Client’s brief and budget.

After leaving Hong Kong and Dubai and prior to relocating to Poland, I was invited to design and oversee the implementation of the town garden of an old school friend.

The site was an L shaped space, full of builders debris and associated with a terraced sirte that dates from the mid -Victorian era.

As most of the budget went on hardscape (including items discovered, salvaged and reclaimed from the site), plants were sourced from friends and family. The metal tanks were the show piece of a functional urban garden for this young city couple.

The images demonstrate the ‘before, during (November 2009) and after (Spring 2010)’ phases, following the harshest winter for 15 years.

As a student of Hinchingbrooke School I volunteered to restore the brick Wendy House and gardens, built as a retreat for an eighteenth century Earl’s daughter.

In subsequent years I also provided designs, plants and urns for the herbaceous Long Border, Rose Garden and House Terrace around the historic Hinchingbrooke House, seat of the Cromwells, Montagus and Earls of Sandwich, and presently the classrooms of the school’s sixth form.